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Future Engineers will be 3-D Printing at the STEM Family Night

I am amazed at the finish of yet another year of the Future Engineers club at Baden Academy.  Come visit their table at the May 31 STEM Family Night at Baden Academy and find out more about how these elementary school students not just learning about engineering the future, but changing lives today.

Permanent link to this article: https://growageneration.com/2018/05/18/future-engineers-will-be-3-d-printing-at-the-stem-family-night/

Three Seton LaSalle Teachers named Distinguished Educators

Three teachers from Seton LaSalle High School are being honored this Wednesday,  May 23rd for the completion of a year-long Distinguished Educator Research Fellowship through Grow a Generation.

Miss Emily Rosati and Dr. Anthony DeCaria partnered to lead seven Seton LaSalle freshman to write an original children’s book about wind energy in Pennsylvania. Their journey began with research.  They were drawn to clean and renewable energy and sought out global and national voices celebrating the latest technology and advances in the field.  They found a mentor in the American Wind Wildlife Institute (AWWI) and began to write their narrative. Wanting to “get things right” the group spend a day traveling to the Patton Wind Farm in Somerset County, St. Francis University Institute for Energy and the Pittsburgh Energy Innovation Center. Edits to their original draft were suggested by Christine Real de Azua from AWWI and everyone they met on the tour.  Their cross-curricular book project complemented and built upon standards and course objectives in a STEM project with real world outcomes.

The book was an opportunity to apply science and language requirements of a high school classroom to a real-world project.  You are invited to buy a copy of The Boy, the Bird, and the Turbine and enjoy the story of a Western Pennsylvanian boy befriending a hawk and discovering more about the new wind turbines that are scattered into their landscape. The book is published through Grow a Generation and available on Lulu   https://goo.gl/cr8Amb   Any and all profits go to AWWI.

 

Mr. Wade Schnorr connected high school astronomy and robotics students of Seton LaSalle High School with real-world problems of space exploration.  His class researched the problems facing space roboticists in the search for life in the atmosphere of Mars, the regolith dust cutting into equipment on the lunar surface, or the methane rain on Titan as the new future Dragonfly drone explores Saturn’s moon.  His class visited Astrobotic, a local space robotics company currently contracting payloads for their first lunar mission. Students Gabi and Ryan filmed an interview with Propulsion Engineer Jeff Hopkins and Systems Engineer Ander Solorzano.  They hosted a virtual visit from Dr. Chuck Woods, Senior Scientist at the Planetary Science Institute and the Executive Director of the Center for Educational Technologies at Wheeling University.  He shared fascinating stories from the twenty-year mission of Cassini Huygens to Saturn and his radar exploration of the moon Titan.  His project website https://rebeloutposts.weebly.com/ has archived the interviews and looks forward to future classes building on the research to experiment in extraterrestrial environments to further scientific discovery and space exploration.

The Grow a Generation Distinguished Educator Research Fellowship is an honor bestowed on teachers nominated by their principals.  Each year-long project seeks to elevate the school, community, and world through meaningful projects made possible.  Congratulations to Emily Rosati, Dr. Anthony DeCaria, and Wade Schnorr.

Permanent link to this article: https://growageneration.com/2018/05/18/three-seton-lasalle-teachers-named-distinguished-educators-2/

Piper Kits on Hand at May 31 STEM Family Night

Have you seen the Piper Kits?  From the moment the kit is unboxed, the kids are immersed in computer engineering. The Baden Academy Nerd Battalion has started to build five kits. Come to the STEM Family night for your child to help us succeed in the next iteration of learning.

Our STEM Family Night is Thursday, May 31, from 6:00 pm to 7:30 pm.  You’ll receive a passport with 22 stops including the Nerd Battalion table and the Piper Kits.  RSVP by emailing medialab@badenacademy.org

Check out our Nerd Battalion End of Year highlights film!

Permanent link to this article: https://growageneration.com/2018/05/14/piper-kits-on-hand-at-may-31-stem-family-night/

How Colors Make Us Feel – Goethe’s Theory of Color by Kelli Keriotis

Congratulations to Kelli Keriotis on her 3rd published book and being named a 2018 Distinguished Educator.

How Colors Make Us Feel explores Goethe’s Theory of Color with kindergarten students from Baden Academy Charter School in Western Pennsylvania.  Enjoy her reading aloud the poetry and art of Kelli Kerotis’ 2018 kindergarten class. Buy the book on Lulu http://www.lulu.com/…/how-c…/paperback/product-23609969.html and find out more about Mrs. Keriotis at https://keriotiscolors.weebly.com/

Permanent link to this article: https://growageneration.com/2018/05/13/5085/

Student written Opioid Book to be featured at county Drug Prevention Night

Baden Academy students Quincy Sirko, Angelina Dioguardi and Clayton Russell will be on hand with their new book, “What the Heck is Opioid Addiction.” at the BVIU Drug Prevention Grant – Parent Night.

Please come support them, and find out what you, as a parent, can do to help end this epidemic.
Our students’ book can be found at http://www.lulu.com/shop/quincy-sirko-and-clayton-russell-and-angelina-dioguardi/what-the-heck-is-opioid-addiction/paperback/product-23600669.html  (Use the code FIFTEEN to save 15%).  Profits go to the American Society of Addiction Medicine.

The BVIU Drug Prevention Grant Committee is offering a “Parent Night” to  further educate our community on the impact of the opioid epidemic.  The Parent Night will have specific information for parents and will include the Saltworks’ Off Script production and a “Show & Tell” from the Beaver County Anti-Drug Task Force.

The event will be held at the Central Valley HS Auditorium on May 16, 2018.  Registration & Refreshments will start at 5:30 PM.  The program will run from  6:00 – 8:00 PM.

Agenda:

·         5:30 – Registration – Refreshments – Anti-Drug Task Force Table

·         6:00 – Opening Remarks – Phil Little, PA Office of Attorney General

·         6:15 – Saltworks “Off Script”

·         7:00 – County Resource Overview – Kate Lowery, Beaver County Behavioral Health

·         7:15 – Testimonial – Ashley Potts – F.B.I. H.O.P.E. Initiative

·         7:45 – Refreshments and Anti-Drug Task Force Table

You may register for the event using the following link: http://bit.ly/ParentNight2018

Permanent link to this article: https://growageneration.com/2018/05/09/student-written-opioid-book-to-be-featured-at-county-drug-prevention-night/

“I study Saturn’s Moon Titan with a three billion dollar spacecraft”

Gabrielle Hirsch and Christian Conway, two Seton LaSalle students working with the Rebel Outposts research fellowship, had an opportunity to interview Dr. Chuck Wood, Senior Scientist at the Planetary Science Institute and the Executive Director of the Center for Educational Technologies at Wheeling University.  Take a listen to some fascinating stories from one of the lead scientists on the Cassini mission to Saturn’s moon Titan.

Seriously, we are exploring moons of Saturn over a billion miles away and our kids in Mt. Lebanon classrooms get to interact with the scientists that build the space ships, analyze the data, and work at the frontiers of human exploration.  Wow – we live in such extraordinary times!

Get your students excited about our new missions to the Moon, Mars, and beyond.

Visit the Challenger Learning Center for information on visits and e-missions to do in your classroom.

Visit the Rebel Outposts website to learn more about this incredible research fellowship to connect high school astronomy and robotics students of our Seton LaSalle High School with real-world problems of space exploration.

Working on solutions to real-world problems is the heart of any STEM investigation. These solutions may include devices and designs that improve our lives, fulfill our needs or wants, and make our world better. From designing a radar system to see through the clouds of methane gas on Titan to testing the possibilities of life within the Mars atmosphere, the opportunity to search for solutions to real-world problems fuels our students’ curiosity and sparks their investigative interests.

Perhaps the most important consequence of students working on real problems is that they begin to develop the 21st century skills that will serve them in their future careers. Skills of innovation, critical thinking, collaboration, emotional intelligence, resilience, leadership and vision are needed for changing global (and inter-planetary) markets. These skills come to the fore with students trusted with the leadership and responsibility of projects that make a real difference in ours and their future.

Permanent link to this article: https://growageneration.com/2018/05/05/i-study-saturns-moon-titan-with-a-three-billion-dollar-spacecraft/

The Boy, the Bird, and the Turbine

Energy is one of the three leading industries of the Pittsburgh Region and students at Seton LaSalle are getting ready to be lead the way!  Seven Seton LaSalle freshman worked through the year with their English teacher, Miss Emily Rosati, and their science teacher, Dr. Anthony DeCaria, to write an original children’s book about wind energy in Pennsylvania.

Their journey began with research.  They were drawn to clean and renewable energy and sought out global and national voices celebrating the latest technology and advances in the field.  They found a mentor in the American Wind Wildlife Institute (AWWI) and began to write their narrative. Wanting to “get things right” the group spend a day traveling to the Patton Wind Farm in Somerset County, St. Francis University Institute for Energy and the Pittsburgh Energy Innovation Center. Edits to their original draft were suggested by Christine Real de Azua from AWWI and everyone they met on the tour.  The book was an opportunity to apply science and language requirements of a high school classroom to a real world project.

Congratulations to the student team of Diego Flores/Cruz, Tyler Hill, Sethan-Jai Doan, Caroline Marston, DaVinci (Joshua Mellor),  Joseph Rouse, and Taylor Weyrich for all their hard work and their desire to inspire kids younger than them to learn more about wind energy. One of their classmates, Sloane McCensky, got involved and created some original artwork to decorate the book, hoping to make it accessible to younger kids.  The team is donating any and all profits to the American Wind Wildlife Institute.

You are invited to buy the book and enjoy the story of a Western Pennsylvanian boy befriending a hawk and discovering more about the new wind turbines that are scattered into their landscape. The book is published through Grow a Generation and available on Lulu   https://goo.gl/cr8Amb

Small teams of students from the project are available to visit your school, library or community group to read aloud their book and share with you their enthusiasm for wind energy.

 

You can visit the project website at https://johnandbeamer.weebly.com/

 

Let us know if your school, classroom, or student wants to become part of a new generation of STEM Athletes, Digital Storytellers, and World Changers.  

Permanent link to this article: https://growageneration.com/2018/05/04/the-boy-the-bird-and-the-turbine/

Beaver biology professor stars in a book published by local fifth-graders

Thank you April Johnston and Penn State Beaver for the fantastic web article of our recent fellows visit to your campus. Reprinted from http://beaver.psu.edu/story/3010/2018/04/06/beaver-biology-professor-star-book-published-local-fifth-graders

Image: Cathy Benscoter Beaver biology professor is the star of a book published by local fifth-graders

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

April 6, 2018
MONACA, Pa. — Imagine this is our future: The insect population explodes. The Zika and West Nile viruses infect billions. Crops die. The rainforest disappears.

That’s not the plot of a dystopian novel. That’s life without bats.

And that scares Kaitlyn Desrochers, a fifth-grader at Baden Academy whose affection for bats began three summers ago when she visited Mammoth Cave National Park and learned about the animal’s rapid decline. So she decided to do something about it.

Desrochers and fellow fifth-grader Kennedi Emery began working in Baden Academy’s media lab to write a book about bats. They’re hoping that once their fellow students know all the ways in which bats help the world, they’ll take up the fight to help save them.

“I don’t know why, but I just really love bats,” Desrochers said.

Although she loves them, she didn’t know enough about the science to complete the book.

So Desrochers and Emery turned to one of Pennsylvania’s leading bat experts for help: Penn State Beaver Associate Professor of Biology Cassandra Miller-Butterworth.

To the fifth-graders, Miller-Butterworth is a kind of superhero. She’s been studying the plight of little brown bats for years, and her work has helped in the understanding of white nose syndrome, the disease that’s killing off the winged creatures at a frightening pace. In the span of just 12 years, white nose syndrome has spread to 29 states in the U.S. and five provinces in Canada.

It’s facts like these that have made Miller-Butterworth’s help on the book invaluable, according to Ellen Cavanaugh. Cavanaugh is the CEO of Grow a Generation, which places research fellows in Baden Academy classrooms to assist students with special projects. She also runs the media lab, so she’s watched as Desrochers and Emery have interviewed Miller-Butterworth, penned passages, sent drafts off to the professor for editing, and then made the necessary changes.

The plot goes something like this: A little brown bat named Kennedi (yes, named after one of the authors) wakes from her hibernation to find that thousands of her bat friends died over the winter. In an effort to save her remaining friends, Kennedi visits Miller-Butterworth’s lab, where she learns strategies to halt the spread of white nose syndrome.

“Plant bat friendly gardens, build a bat house and spread the word,” Miller-Butterworth says. “Love bats. Don’t be afraid of them. You’re more likely to be struck by lightning than to contract rabies from a bat.”

The book is also stuffed with fun bat facts: Bats eat their weight in insects every night. Bats are responsible for more than 90 percent of the regeneration of rain forests. Bats save farmers in the United States more than $23 billion a year in pesticides.

The book should be ready for publication in August and will be available on the Amazon and Barnes and Noble websites, with all proceeds going to bat conservation. Desrochers and Emery also will make an appearance at the Beaver County Book Fair to do a few book signings.

But first, they get to tell their fellow students all about their experience working with Miller-Butterworth, including the morning in March when they visited her lab, donned white lab coats and got to see bat DNA.

“Bat DNA!” Cavanaugh said to the fifth-graders. “Do you have any idea how cool that is?”

Based on the wide smiles planted on Desrochers and Emery’s faces, it was very, very cool.

Permanent link to this article: https://growageneration.com/2018/04/24/beaver-biology-professor-stars-in-a-book-published-by-local-fifth-graders/

Visiting Pittsburgh’s Energy Innovation Center

Sitting in the heart of Pittsburgh, the Energy Innovation center stands as a symbol of the changes taking place within the city. Once the Clifford B. Connelley Trade School, the Energy Innovation Center functions as a prototype example of taking an older style building and bringing it into the next century while still keeping the charm it possesses as a landmark of the city of Pittsburgh. On February 23rd, 2018 ten Students and two teachers from Seton LaSalle High School we gave the opportunity to tour the Energy Innovation Center, and see first hand the way a historical monument comes together with a sustainable future model.

The Energy Innovation Center is still being used to educate but is now gone away from the trades that the city of Pittsburgh was once known for. Their mission is to contribute to socially responsible workforce development, foster energy and sustainable technology advancement, and assist in job creation through a commitment to diversity, innovation and comprehensive education. It is referred to as a “green” energy center, a center for research and job training in the energy fields, including new, sustainable energy systems. Wind energy was the topic of our STEM Tour and a particular interest to the students working on a classroom book project, The Boy, the Bird, and the Turbine.

Within the walls of the Center you’ll find corporations and startups, and universities like Penn State and Pitt. Soon UPMC will be moving in and using a new state of art surgical suite in order to train sanitary operating room practices.  While they didn’t get to step inside, a tour guide pointed out the Electric Power Technologies Laboratory led by Dr. Reed.  The lab focuses on advanced electric power grid and energy generation, transmission, and distribution-system technologies; power electronics and control technologies; renewable energy systems and integration; smart grid technologies and applications; and energy-storage development.

Training at the Energy Innovation Center focuses on industry required certifications and skills  Courses are currently available in

 

The Introduction to the Trades class is a unique introductory overview to building trades. During the six-week course, participants are exposed to a wide range of skilled occupations, through field trips to state-of-the-art union training facilities, hands-on activities, and meetings with expert craftspeople representing 18 local trade unions. In addition, the classroom portion introduces key job readiness skills needed to begin a career in the building and construction trades. Upon completion, successful participants will have the option of taking the next step and applying for union apprenticeship.

The students were amazed by the environmentally friendly technical innovations that are quickly becoming the norm for the city. Innovations including water soaking asphalt in the parking lot and a vertical wind turbine to help supplement energy for the building. On the outside the box type of idea for the cooling system of the building, Joseph Rouse had this to say “I like this place the best.  It is so cool how they did the big containers of ice in the swimming pool for the air conditioning of this building!”

Dr. Anthony DeCaria, the students’ science teacher at Seton LaSalle High School, summed up the true purpose of the EIC when he said “It seems like a good place to launch an idea. It is a great environment for the cross-pollination of thoughts and collaboration.”

Permanent link to this article: https://growageneration.com/2018/04/20/visiting-pittsburghs-energy-innovation-center/

Max and the Tornado by Brian Curry

Congratulations Brian Curry on you first published book, Max and the Tornado! He worked for two years assembling the story with mentors Mrs. Breaden and Tim VIgnere, painstakingly using Photoshop and original artwork from Kelli Keriotis to complete the illustrations.  Third graders Matthew Minnite and Noah Schweikert finished the final two pages of artwork and got the book ready for publication.in the Baden Academy Media Lab.  The book was a research fellows project at the school.

 

The description reads: “Max and his family must respond quickly to a tornado warning, but the loud wind makes him frightened. This story reinforces for children checklists and procedures to survive a tornado.”  All profits from the book benefit the American Red Cross. Get your copy today from Lulu, or come to the Baden Academy Story Walk to his first book signing.

Way to go Brian – you indeed wrote a book that could save a life!

Permanent link to this article: https://growageneration.com/2018/04/07/max-and-the-tornado-by-brian-curry/